Madiba’s Lessons For Business

The children were always close to Madiba's heart. We try to perpetuate this love - showing it through the Fairhills learner nutrition programme, amongst others.

The children were always close to Madiba’s heart. We try to perpetuate this love – showing it through the Fairhills learner nutrition programme, amongst others.

The father of modern South Africa passed away peacefully on the 5th of December at 20:40 SAST. This marked the end of an era for our nation, an era of transformation, reconciliation and selfless leadership lead by the moral compass of our greatest son. This great southern nation has just concluded ten days of mourning in what has been, an emotional roller-coaster for most. Obviously, he too is only mortal, and all mortals have their detractors. Minority negativity aside, no man has done more to unite differing opinion, ethnicities, ideologies and religions than Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.

Does this mean South Africa’s work is over? No, furthest from it. Mandela merely built a multi-racial and democratic foundation on which the hopes and dreams of all South Africans must be built. He could never have fixed decades of legislated segregation and centuries of ethnic bigotry in his five year presidency and near twenty-four years of post-imprisonment. His work is up to us now; the torch of his legacy has been passed to the fifty-million children of the south.

South African businesses have their role to play. Madiba has also taught the private-sector valuable lessons about becoming part of positive change. It has been said by some that he was a socialist, even a communist, at heart. There is truth in this. However, Mandela was foremost a pragmatist, a learned man and a listener; he realised the world had changed, he realised all sectors were needed to build a nation, non-governmental, governmental and private. Rather than being a rigid idealist, he adapted his vision to a changing world, just as he expected far-Right-and-Left South Africans to adapt theirs. Instead of nationalising every strategic industry, he chose to teach industry something more valuable.

Ubuntu: Encompassing all noble human virtues, I am me because of you. So it must be with business in South Africa. Business will always need to pursue a profit, for without profit, small businesses, entrepreneurs and corporations cease to exist. Without it, job-creation will unsustainably fall completely upon the shoulders of the State and entrepreneurship and private-innovation will perish. However, we must do so responsibly, sustainably and inclusively. We must do so in the spirit of Ubuntu, where no cog within the machine of humanity and indeed, business, can exist without the other; the hands that pick, the hands that transport, the hands that vinify, the hands that market and those that manage; neither can work if the other does not.

With our troubled past, the need for corporate social responsibility in no stronger than in South Africa. Madiba had influenced our company, as we awoke early to the needs of our community. Thus, we did not hesitate to join Origin Wines in starting our FairTrade, Fairhills project. He opened our eyes to our responsibility as not only being to our clientèle, but also to our people.

We pledge as a company to live his ideals, we promise to perpetuate his legacy in our own small way. We are all responsible: labour, business, individuals, government, irrespective of dark or light complexion. It may sound opportunistic for a company to hop on the Mabida bandwagon. However, his call for change, his call for compassion and his call for Pan-African-betterment knew no bounds. We will continue to do what we can to fulfil his dreams. For his dreams weren’t his own, they were the dreams of a nation.

By Andres de Wet

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