Community Clinic Launched for DuToitskloof Labour

Fair Exchange rural clinic on opening day

Fair Exchange rural clinic on opening day

On 13 May 2013, Fairhills Project, DuToitskloof Wines’ Fairtrade empowerment project, opened the new community clinic adjacent to the improved Lorraine Primary School. This project will complete a consolidated community service node, in this proximal location for associated farm labour. 

Together with a generous R720,000 grant from WM Morrisons and cooperation with our cellar, Fair Exchange and Origin, The mobile healthcare unit and Fair Exchange clinic was launched to much fanfare this Monday. The grant was handed over to the Fairhills Project by representatives from WM Morrisons United Kingdom.

Not only will Lorraine Primary now cater to all learners from grades one through seven, quality primary medical services will be available to all Fairhills’ farm employees, free of charge. This development expands the services on offer within this innovative empowerment project, which already includes psychological services, day-care facilities, above-standard housing, green-energy for heating and quality primary education services.

The community library will be moving to the new facility, to make way for an expanded and heavily-utilised community computer centre. This state-of-the-art facility is not only available to all learners, but provides the community with access to information technology and doubles as an adult-learning centre. The new infrastructure is fully air-conditioned, with the Western Cape Dept. of Health assisting with equipment, maintenance and logistics at the new clinic.

The clinic boasts a sick-bay with television and all primary medical equipment, a consultation room, a waiting room, administrative office and full bathroom facilities. The clinic sports a unique mobile healthcare centre; fully equipped and on wheels, this innovative concept brings healthcare to each producer farm within the Fairhills’ family.

The relocated library provides the same quality services the project members’ have become accustomed to, including up-to-date computer technology, multi-media tools and even, two PlayStation ports for the young-ones.

Landscape improvements are also being implemented to address the secondary, but important aspect, of an attractive and livable community, building pride-of-place. Outdoor play-spaces for the learners are being improved, with miniature sports courts being constructed and lush lawns lined with trees, being planted.

DuToitskloof Wines, with the continued hard work of their Fairtrade project, Fairhills, continues to improve the lives of rural people each year.  We trust the new facilities will assist in addressing social ills, provide improved healthcare, foster skills development and ensure quality education for the community. All this, to build a brighter, empowered future.

By: Andres de Wet

Security improvements and signage for the Library and Medical Centre

Security improvements and signage for the Library and Medical Centre

Our computer centre, undergoing duplication.

Our computer centre, undergoing duplication.

New developments, courtesy to some great partnerships.

New developments, courtesy to some great partnerships.

Our relocated library

Our relocated library

Corridor to the Waiting Room (foreground) and Consultation and Sick-Bays (background)

Corridor to the Waiting Room (foreground) and Consultation and Sick-Bays (background)

Yes, a PlayStation (one of two) for the young ones.

Yes, a PlayStation (one of two) for the young ones.

Installing a unit for our fully air-conditioned clinic and library

Installing a unit for our fully air-conditioned clinic and library

WM Morrisons, Origin and FairTrade opening the new clinic for the Fairhills DuToitskloof empowerment project

WM Morrisons, Origin and FairTrade opening the new clinic for the Fairhills DuToitskloof empowerment project

The generous grant from WM Morrisons being handed over.

The generous grant from WM Morrisons being handed over.

The mobile healthcare unit, bringing care to rural communities, when and where they need it.

The mobile healthcare unit, bringing care to rural communities, when and where they need it.

Some of our little beneficiaries (Fairhills Creche) welcoming the guests in a way only they can!

Some of our little beneficiaries (Fairhills Creche) welcoming the guests in a way only they can!

 

Du Toitskloof & Fairtrade

Press Release: 19 November 2012

Du Toitskloof Wines (DTKW) is very proud of the fact that in terms of the accreditation by Fairtrade of the cellar and the farms of all its members almost eight years ago, it presently operates and sells Fairtrade certified wines, either in bulk or bottle, supporting one of the biggest Fairtrade projects anywhere in the world.

To receive Fairtrade accreditation, DTKW and its members had to achieve and has maintained a high standard of ethical and sustainable farming and winemaking practices, particularly in the treatment and remuneration of workers. Every farm and the cellar, undergoes a stringent auditing process each year for the renewal of their Fairtrade certification.

All cellar staff members are paid substantially more than the minimum wages prescribed by government. However, the ethical treatment of staff involves much more than the monthly or weekly wages they earn; it also involves their overall level of well-

Fairhills kids playing at the newly renovated Tierstel Daycare Centre – Now sports veggie tunnel

being and quality of life. For this reason, accommodation is made available to them free of charge or at very low monthly rentals. Early in 2012, DTKW upgraded all its staff accommodation. Houses were gutted on a rotation basis and completely refurbished: new ceilings, new floors, kitchen cupboards, bathrooms, new plumbing and new electrification were installed.

The Fairhills project that has resulted from our Fairtrade accreditation, has contributed enormously in recent years to the enrichment of the lives of not only the workers, but of their families, in particular the children. Everyone is involved in this project: all our 13 producer-members, their 19 grape farms, approximately 400 farm workers and their 1 200 dependents.

The project is managed independently by a committee of 34 farm workers, who decide how the premium income will be allocated and to which projects. The premium of €0.70 in the case of red wine and €0.80 in the case of white, is paid by socially-conscious consumers, who buy Fairtrade wines such as those produced by DTKW, thus contributing to the upliftment of workers in participating emerging countries.

In addition to the premium paid by consumers, the Fairhills project also receives funding from certain overseas retailers, local non-governmental organisations, South African government departments with DTKW itself, a substantial contributor.

One of the first projects initiated by Fairhills, was the establishment of day-care centres for the children of working parents, staffed by trained caregivers. Three have been in operation since 2006. Today they provide care for 170 children between the ages of three months and five years. The children are transported to and from the centres in buses bought for this purpose, receive two nourishing meals a day, and are checked once a week by a qualified medical nurse. All activities are selected to stimulate development while the older children, those between four and five years old, are taught computer literacy.

These centres, where children from non-Fairtrade farms are also welcome, are run by an ex-farm worker and a management committee of farm workers. They provide employment for 23 women from the surrounding farms, who all receive ongoing training in early-childhood development.

The Fairhills Project is also deeply involved in the running of the Lorraine Primary School, situated on one of our member farms. The school has approximately 100 learners, of which almost 90% are from member farms. It originally only consisted of three classrooms. The first addition was a kitchen, where meals could be prepared for learners as well as for the little ones in day-care centres.

In the last few years separate classrooms were added for grades 3 and 4, while a new classroom for Grade 5 is proposed for 2013. When completed, every grade will have its own classroom, where specific learners can be taught for longer periods in a familiar environment.

A community library opened its doors two years ago, which serves both learners and adults. In the same year the school completed construction of a computer centre, which today, has a bank of 28 computers. Those receiving training in addition to the older children at the day-care centres, are learners at the primary school, as well as Fairhills learners in Grades 11 and 12.

Attached to the school is an after-care centre available to learners up to and including Grade 4. These learners are assisted with their homework and also receive an after-school lunch. At the same time, it provides employment for four adults who manage the programme.

Over the years a community centre was built which plays an important role as a focal point of social activities and a meeting place for members of the community.

 —Ends— 

FairTrade: Drinking With Your Heart

The cute children of the Fairhills Creche (early-childhood development program)

Fairhills: South Africa Project

It is indeed a pity that in today’s South Africa, the name FairTrade is still so seldom heard. In actual fact, many people don’t even know it exists. If they do, they’re unsure what a FairTrade product means. DuTotiskloof Wines hosts the largest FairTrade project in the world, namely Fairhills; yet, so few of their loyal wine drinkers are aware what type of responsible purchase they’re making when they take the wine off the shelf.

Granted, FairTrade was aimed at the first-world customer. It was started to ensure the conscious consumer that any agricultural product they purchase with that label, would be produced in a responsible manner. Thus, to expect the emerging economy consumer to take notice may be a little tough an ask, or is it?

In South Africa, with its overactive sense of social consciousness due to a tumultuous past, with empowerment and rural reform firmly on the political agenda, one wonders why FairTrade hasn’t made more of an impact in the local market. We are, after all, not your run-of-the-mill emerging economy, we are a country of two halves making a whole; we are a nation striving to better the fortunes of the previously marginalised and bridge those two halves.

For the cellar and the producer, being FairTrade accredited comes with a heavy burden. Not only the mountain of paperwork it produces, but the regulations, audits and criterion which far exceed South African labour and empowerment legislation. The additional costs and demands which come with the label can be sizeable. However, with that burden, some hefty rewards are forthcoming.

One, a clear conscience; FairTrade means you go above-and-beyond to ensure safe, fair and above-par labour practices. Two, it provides your workforce with best-in-industry housing and working conditions leading to a higher quality employee. Three, it fosters skills development, not only in providing adult skills-training, but also in boosting childhood education and providing after-school programs. Four, it ensures we produce wine that is environmentally responsible; after all, farmers have the most to lose from Climate Change.

So, when you pick up a bottle of FairTrade wine, are you just drinking it because of the joy a Cabernet or a Sauvignon can bring to a dinner engagement, a party or a sunset with friends… or are you thinking about what went into it? Purchasing FairTrade is purchasing with philanthropic intent. Buying FairTrade is consuming that 750ml of joy, whilst bringing joy to the peoples of rural areas and bringing joy to the earth. Buy smart and buy responsibly.