Leveraging Seasonal Tourism

In the Cape, we’re extremely adept at doing summer. As a person who is a vehement foe of excessive heat, I don’t quite get it. I understand most enjoy the constant sun and heat of lengthy days; however, we are typecasting the Cape to our seasonal detriment. The Secret Season movement has had a limited impact.

This lopsided view of what quantifies as an asset to the Cape, is evident in Lufthansa, Virgin Atlantic, Edelweiss and Air France withdrawing and many other air carriers offering a reduced service during the austral winter.  Is May to October in the Cape really that bad? Whose view have we listened to on what is good weather and what is not? If it’s our fellow South Africans, then we’re getting the wrong advice from a biased source. The rest of South Africa knows the milder days of bone-dry winters; of course they’d lament ours.

Northern European summers often resemble our good winter days and some countries are crying out for 16°C highs between May and September. BRICS-nations, like India and China, are stiflingly humid and hot during these months and obviously, the Gulf States are like blast furnaces. The Indians and Chinese would relish our off-season. Although our friends from the UAE, Oman and Qatar may not indulge in the wine, they’ll revel in the associated amenities and other tourism activities.

The Cape is one of the few places on the African continent that truly has seasons, and seasons are a valuable asset. Just ask the town of Bright in Victoria, Australia. Its tourism marketing is focused on the town’s plethora of northern hemisphere trees that change vivid shades in the austral autumn, exceedingly rare to see in our hemisphere.

Locally, the West Coast and Namaqualand does this well during the springtime. Granted, some areas of this region can appear pretty barren during the rest of the year; daisies popping up on any open piece of land are a welcome scenic respite and an obvious draw-card.

The Cape Winelands and the Western Cape as a whole, should be making a more concerted and consolidated effort to debunk the myth that seasons = bad. Not that the provincial tourism authorities haven’t tried, but the entire tourism/conferencing industry, and even local governments, need to help in debunking this myth, to build a more calendar-ubiquitous tourism economy.

Seasons offer diversity and choice. Durban may offer ‘South Africa’s warmest welcome.’ However, where we can offer a warm welcome, a mild welcome or a refreshing welcome, Durban only has a warmest and outright sweaty welcome on offer. Seasons are an asset, we should use it.

No insult intended – just not a personal fan of humidity with heat… Some like it hot ;-)

Urban and some rural landscaping in parts of the Western Cape have failed to cement this. There has been a huge push nationally to use indigenous trees only. This has often resulted in towns planting Fever Trees and other odd choices as street trees. Guess what landscape designers? A tree knows no geo-political boundaries. A tree, although classified as South African indigenous, if from the Lowveld (or elsewhere in SA), is still as exotic to the Cape as an Oak or Liquidambar. If it’s not from the Cape Floristic Kingdom, to nature, it’s foreign. Plus, the aesthetic treatment given to our Winelands towns is the Phalaborwa-look; neither unique, nor apt. A town good at preserving Wineland’s heritage, is Stellenbosch, ardently preserving the Eikestad (oak city) moniker and using urban landscape as a tourism draw.

Other towns can and must do the same, especially those struggling to get on the tourist map. Let’s leverage every asset we have; the blossoming orchards in spring, the warm, balmy grape harvest of summer, the vivid tones of changing leaves of autumn and the verdant fields and snow-capped peaks of winter. Lastly, we need to sell it!

The passage of seasons near Du Toitskloof Cellar - from the same spot at 9:00am in May, July, October & January

The passage of seasons near Du Toitskloof Cellar – from the same spot at 9:00am in May, July, October & January

By: Andres de Wet

Changing Face of Wine Patrons

Long gone are the days when wine-drinking was the pursuit of a certain demographic, a certain age group and a certain culture. Some traditionalists may lament the manoeuvres of a romantic-industry becoming approachable and accessible. However, we find it heart-warming to see the spectrum of wine consumers broadening.

This shift has been evident in the changing demographics of festival-goers in the Western Cape, with the latest Soetes & Soup Festival in Breedekloof being no exception. Change is in the air, or shall we say, in the nose, and it’s not the vintages adding a different flavour to South Africa’s wine industry. The broad tapestry that is South Africa’s diverse populous is coming out in force more readily; it is adding a richer dynamic to wine appellations that were previously perceived to be overtly conservative and monocultural.

This diversification is excellent for the wine regions in question; it diversifies the tourism offering as customers become broader in their amenity needs, it adds multiculturalism to lesser-known districts and forces wine producers to think broadly, creatively and become more innovative.

It doesn’t help only empowering the staff associated with the production of wine, as is the case with FairTrade; consumers of all backgrounds need to feel welcome if a brand is to be perceived as “progressive.” Du Toitskloof has always prided itself on being “progressive.” Thus, our utter joy in seeing the tapestry of whom we welcome into our cellar doors and at our tasting-stands becoming more varied. Slowly but surely, we are becoming a universal brand with universal appeal.

The most successful tourism brands in the world are those that are known as “diverse and welcoming destinations.” It is not the exclusive, aloof and single-minded destinations that warm the hearts of potential visitors. It’s this reason why a city like Riyadh does not attract the same numbers as Dubai does.

This is what we’re aiming to achieve be diversifying our offering, including enlarging our deli, improving our landscaping and tasting room, adding adventure-tourism options and broadening our wine offering with the likes of Quest and Cape Beach Club. We want you to feel welcome in our ‘home’ and we want you to enjoy our fruits-of-the-vine whilst building fond memories. No matter your origin, hue or language, we want you to become part of the Du Toitskloof family. The more the merrier!

FacesofDTK-Jul2013Blog copy

 

By: Andres de Wet

Master-Coup For Winelands

Arnold Tanzer (MasterChef: Food on the Move), Samantha Linsell (MasterChef Food Stylist: Drizzle&Dip), Benny Masekwameng (MasterChef Judge)

Arnold Tanzer (MasterChef: Food on the Move), Samantha Linsell (MasterChef Food Stylist: Drizzle&Dip), Benny Masekwameng (MasterChef Judge)

MasterChef season two began airing on M-NET with great fanfare, being heavily punted by the South African pay-TV broadcaster and well-received by the South African viewing public. What can be said with the greatest conviction is that the production quality of this hit reality TV-series is beyond compare. The food styling, wine presentation, culinary complexity, camera work and post-production mastery have not been seen on this level in local South African productions, until now.

How lucky are we that this reality TV masterpiece takes place at Nederburg in Paarl, a huge coup for the Cape Winelands. We can only hope that international TV-stations will snap up this series from M-NET, to give our region some exposure outside of Africa and DStv’s footprint. The show puts the Cape on show, both scenically and culinarily. Seafood on the West Coast, to traditional Cape-cuisine in the Winelands, Cape Malay in the city’s Bo-Kaap to food on the open fire at Mzoli’s in Gugulethu – it is proudly South African and boastful of the diversity in a mere 150km radius of Cape Town in every possible way.

MasterChef has popularised food and wine. It has turned its creative masters into overnight sensations. We have been fortunate enough to host the friendly, knowledgeable and talented Benny Masekwameng (MasterChef SA judge) at DuToitskloof Cellar, at a culinary competition in August 2012. It has made food and wine “hip and happening” again, taking the passion out of 5-star restaurants and classy wine estates and right into people’s hearts and homes.

I had reservations about the show, prior to season one’s launch in March of 2012. The Australian version of the show is stellar, albeit extremely lengthy, and tops their national viewership rankings. The American version, although boasting Gordon Ramsay, was an epic fail. The U.S. need for speed trumped the format, with the series feeling rushed, one was unable to emotionally attach to the contestants and the challenges and culinary complexity was lackluster to say the least. Not with MasterChef SA however. They opted for a hybrid between the Australian and American versions and their season two, seems to be following the successful former’s format more closely than season one.

The largest reservation was about South African broadcasters’ Johannesburg-centricity. As much as the economic juggernaut has the bulk of local television infrastructure; a culinary, viticulture and fresh-produce capital it is not. Any thought of a culinary contest being held on the Highveld was as absurd as having a mining-entrepreneurship ‘Apprentice’ series set in Cape Town. To my delight, Paarl emerged bright, mountainous and carpeted in vines, on screen; a mere twenty minutes drive from our cellar’s front door.

We hope the start of season two will bolster interest in the Cape Winelands even more, as a scenic culinary and viticulture destination beyond compare. It is hoped it will broaden the scope of people’s perceptions of the region, of being more than just Stellenbosch. When you’re struck by the helicopter-shot panorama of the approach to the MasterChef kitchen, notice the mountains beyond. There lies the gateway to our region, just a few kilometers over the peaks.

Hopefully, our region too, can learn lessons from this show. Popularisation can be positive if it’s done sensitively, fusing the genuineness of what you have to offer with intense public interest. Given that MasterChef is only a mountain range away, here’s to foisting our region into the popular spotlight.

By: Andres de Wet

Green Secrets of Winter

Hex River Valley from the N1

Hex River Valley from the N1

February is always too scorching whilst June is always too wet and frigid: Capetonians can be a fickle lot. We live in one of the most beautiful places on the planet, blessed with weather that most people find utterly temperate; with neither the stifling humidity of Miami, nor the thermo-fan oven that is Dubai, nor the blast-chiller that is Toronto nor the chilly, gloom that is London. Yet, we often confine ourselves to the office, shop and home when the “mild winter chill” sets in from June to September.

Yet, this is when the Cape really goes to town; this is when she dresses

Fonteintjiesberg above Worcester from Nuy

Fonteintjiesberg above Worcester from Nuy

in her winter best, when hardly any tourists even sneak a peek. Taking a break into the country is truly awe-inspiring when the Cape adorns her green garb of the Secret Season. At no other time of the year are the colours more vivid, the atmosphere more crisp and clear and the pursuit of great cuisine and fine reds, more fulfilling.

Take the N1 east from Cape Town. As you travel through the rolling hills of Joostenbergvlakte between Bellville and Paarl, an emerald-green landscape greets you in a genteel fashion reminiscent of Ireland. The N1 then turns slightly northward as it enters the beautiful Berg River Valley of Paarl, with the mountains looming larger now – if lucky enough to make the trek after a winter storm, snow will greet you on the Klein Drakenstein Ranges. Paarl has numerous hidden tourist gems like the language monument and a plethora of excellent restaurants, serving all manner of tasty fare.

Venture over the mountains. On a clear day, opt for the R101 DuToitskloof Pass in lieu of the N1 Huguenot Tunnel. The waterfalls, green fynbos-clad mountainsides and high-altitude vistas are unparalleled. Here, the mountain snow becomes more evident, with the 1995m high DuToit’s Peak often poking into the clouds as a frosted, jagged spire.

Late-autumn colours at Du Toitskloof producers

Late-autumn colours at Du Toitskloof producers

The Breede River Valley opens up on the other side, with a patchwork of stark, dormant vines, with the deep green of winter grass covering each patch of open earth. The mountains are higher, their snow-capped summits, more beautiful. Turning off at R101 Rawsonville, you begin to take in the Breedekloof Wine Route. Here is where you’ll find DuToitskloof Cellar. Take in a scrumptious deli lunch and dabble in some of our value-for-money wines, our multi-award-winning Dimension red and our lauded fortified wines, like Hanepoot Jerepigo, Red Muscadel and Cape Ruby (Port). Do not turn your nose up to the sweeter wines. Given a cold snap, a fire place and appropriate hors d’oeuvre or dessert, there is no better option to warm the heart and enhance the ambience.

Venturing through the surrounding wine route is rewarding, most visitors being dumbfounded by the quality of wines at prices that are at a fraction of other regions. The vistas are truly unique, often looking more like one is touring in the southern Alps, than the Cape Winelands. Do yourself a favour and track the winter storms. If snow has fallen, make your way to the interior Winelands soonest, for the ultimate picturesque experience and bring your camera!

Heavy snowfall at Klondyke atop Swaarmoed Pass, Ceres

Heavy snowfall at Klondyke atop Swaarmoed Pass, Ceres

If time allows, continue up the R43 towards Wolseley, taking in the breathtaking Mitchell’s Pass on the R46 en route to the queen-of-the-snows, Ceres. The Warmbokkeveld Valley opens op rapidly, above the summit of the pass; after storms, snow creeps down to the base of the mountains. The valley is an assault of white and green on the eyes, with a European-like briskness to the air. This region should be a pilgrimage every Capetonian should make once per winter. Through Ceres, venture up Gydo, Theronsberg or Swaarmoed Passes, to take in your slice of a South African winter wonderland.

Make the Cape Winelands interior part of your winter breakaway plans. You can’t beat the winter; so embrace it, revel in it, wine-and-dine it and photographically document it. There’s no more gorgeous a place, where the South African winter comes in its full splendor, than the Breede River, Hex River and Ceres Valley’s.

Winelands Toll Trap

The proposed tolling of the N1 and N2 in the Winelands has raised the ire of most residents and local government entities in the province. The City of Cape Town and SANRAL (South African National Roads Agency) seem set for another court showdown. The demand for clarity on toll-costs and socio-economic implications is not only fair; all citizens in this province should demand this information, as this project could have significant impacts on the economy and thus, the prosperity of affected areas in the Western Cape, particularly the eastern Winelands and Overberg.

The N1 (proposed to be tolled) in the Rawsonville district

The N1 (proposed to be tolled) in the Rawsonville district

PROJECT SCOPE: SANRAL has declared the N1 as a toll-road from Old Oak Interchange to Sandhills in the Hex River Valley and the N2 from the R300 Interchange to Bot River. Three tolls along each route are proposed. On the N1, these proposed toll plazas are at Joostenbergvlakte, the existing Huguenot Toll Plaza (where fees are proposed to be significantly raised) and Glen Heatlie between Worcester and De Doorns. On the N2, one plaza is proposed near Khayelitsha, one at Sir Lowry’s Pass and the other, at Bot River. Don’t think you’ll be able to get around the tolls, where viable alternative routes exists, like the R101 Du Toitskloof Pass, SANRAL will construct ramp-toll plazas on these exits.

They are planning some significant upgrades to the roads, so why is the Western Cape populace vexed? The anger in Gauteng over the controversial eTolls is still boiling over, yet SANRAL sees fit to set another pot to high-heat in our province. The Auditor General reports on countless billions being misspent per annum, yet SANRAL, a government parastatal, pleads poverty. Furthermore, the stark contrast in this province, where most roads are (Provincial Government – Western Cape) PGWC maintained, from the fiscus. Our infrastructure is generally well maintained, unlike numerous other provinces. The N1 and N2 westwards form the aforementioned points, where SANRAL jurisdiction ends, is in a better condition. In recent years these PGWC sections have seen resurfacing, highway lighting and the significant upgrading of numerous interchanges take place. Thus the resident logically asks, “Why can the PGWC maintain and upgrade our roads with our tax-money whilst SANRAL is unable to do so?”

Admittedly, there are bottlenecks in our infrastructure in these proposed tolled-areas: one being the N1 at the Huguenot Tunnel and two, the N2 through Somerset West and Strand. I am not against greenfields tolling. Thus, the Helderberg Bypass could be constructed without entrapping the Elgin Valley. The opening of the second Huguenot Tunnel (already bored – requires lining and equipping) is not up for debate. This sector is already user-pays and has been so since 1989; road improvements go without saying.

The economic impacts could be serious indeed. SANRAL commissions studies that investigate the economic impact of the “do nothing” or “if they toll” scenarios. This creates a bias in the analysis. No roads agency or governmental entity is entitled to “do nothing” to the infrastructure, as population, road-usage and by inference, revenue increases. Even under this potentially biased analysis, undertaken by UCT Graduate Business School, it is admitted that communities north-east of Paarl would see little cost-benefit in the short to medium-term, as traffic volumes are too light. Even under their analysis, agriculture could experience hardship, the lifeblood of these communities. Even under their analysis, the Hex River and Elgin Valleys would become entrapped to tolls, cut off from their service centre towns, major markets and neighbouring engines of economic growth. Even with this information, SANRAL has to date, made no attempt to move toll plazas to locations that would not hold these communities hostage. They have admittedly, offered Hex River Valley residents the option of toll discounts.

Furthermore, rural tolling is an even crueler pursuit, as public-transit or non-motorised transit options simply don’t exist and probably never will. This seriously disadvantages rural communities and the workforce, such as those under FairTrade’s umbrella. It restricts their freedom of movement and access to economic and service centres in the province, as mobility is made unaffordable.

Grabouw and De Doorns, communities plagued by recent civil upheaval, will be the worst affected. Whatever the reason for the recent unrest, the obvious catalysts remain lack of employment and poor local economic conditions. With spiraling fuel and transport costs, additional tolling has only one outcome for these communities on an economic and social knife-edge. Communities like Rawsonville, where we are located, have had a perennial struggle to attract tourist numbers. The toll tunnel has acted as a psychological barrier for years. Additional toll gates and fees on these routes will only exacerbate the issue. Tourists and Capetonian wine-drinkers will not only think twice before venturing out along the N1 and N2, they’ll think thrice.

Where possible, tourists and residents alike will look to the free-to-use provincial roads to escape the toll; this will severely burden these secondary routes and the provincial transport department. For areas such as the Breede River Valley, no viable alternative exists and businesses and communities will be kept entrapped and tourists, out. For a wine company constantly aiming for value-for-money, this could seriously impact on our business model of bringing products to the consumer at affordable prices.

SANRAL’s public participation process has lacked reach and transparency, where the bare legal minimum is done in consulting with communities. There’s a universal awareness of the intense public opposition to the inequitable user-pays policy. We already pay through hefty fuel-levies which rise annually, along with the spiraling cost of fuel in South Africa. Ring-fence the levy, make them provincially imposed according to local need. It’s the cheapest and most equitable form of roads funding there is, with the least risk of graft or corruption.

My suggestion if SANRAL is unable to fund their infrastructure: cede control of the roads west of Bloukrans River and Three Sisters to the Provincial Government of the Western Cape. Allow the national treasury to grant them that equitable share of SANRAL’s allocated budget for these road-sectors. It is clear our provincial administration is able to maintain the infrastructure under their jurisdiction.

By: Andres de Wet (DuToitskloof Online Content Manager)

Can Newer Wine Regions Make Waves?

Breedekloof Wine Route, surrounding the village of Rawsonville, can learn a tremendous amount from newer wine regions. Although the art of growing vines and making wine is an old, intrinsic art in the valley, the wine route as a marketing entity, is relatively new. Thus, the area faces numerous challenges in making a name for itself.

Hermanus-vs-Rawsonville

I picked up the new Essential Guide to South African Wines: Terroir & Travel (authors: Elmari Swart, Izak Smit); I was excited by its fresh look, reminding me of the graphics-rich DK Travel Guides. I was left disappointed, albeit not all that surprised, when I realised the Breede River Valley appeared glaringly absent, despite it being the largest, by-volume, contributor to Cape Winelands’ production.  There it finally was, Breedekloof and Worcester, given a concise, text-based description, alongside Plettenberg Bay and Orange River towards the end of the book.

Where I picked up this book was more significant though. I was in the Hemel-en-Aarde Valley, one of South Africa’s southernmost regions, just to the north of picturesque, whale-famous, Hermanus. It too, is a newer wine route, with Walker Bay only afforded full wine region status in May 2004. It has its shortcomings and strengths, as does our region, the Breedekloof. What we lack, they have and conversely: They have a tourist hub town, we do not; they have no major tarred through route, we do. This will soon change, as the R320 is being sealed from the Hemel-en-Aarde valley to the N2 in Caledon.

Their uniqueness as a region is glaringly obvious. Somehow the cellars are doing something out-of-the-ordinary here, that sets this region apart, even from juggernauts like Stellenbosch and Frasnchhoek. It’s quirky, fresh, accommodating and amenity-rich, without being commercial cheese. Could this be why this dead-end road with no sealed outlet (yet), appears to be thriving? Is it the power of Hermanus over the Camphill Ridge? Or is it that one cellar struts her stuff in Parisian burlesque garb, whilst another does so in traditional Cape-Dutch attire? One cellar oozes über-contemporary chic and the other, gothic revivalist grace? Is it that some are glaringly nouveau-riche and others, historic-conservationist and traditional? The diversity in a distance of barely 10km, was so much to take in: I was happy, in awe, but exhausted.

One may say we have an uphill battle, as the village of Rawsonville could never compete with the town, that is Hermanus. This is probably true for the foreseeable future; they just have the tourism critical mass already. They have the sea and the whales and we don’t. However, we do have greater wine volumes, offer better value-for-money, taller mountains and easier access to all parts of the Cape and the rest of South Africa for that matter. All our roads are already tarred, so why the lack of attention?

Could it lie in our ability to be quirky, to redefine ourselves and create that in our cellars: setting us apart, making ourselves unique? I’m still debating how this can be enacted, but one thing is for sure, Hemel-en-Aarde is one unique little area with some weird and wonderful cellars. If our wine route’s value-for-money, wine quality and statuesque beauty is anything to go by, our region could do the same. We just need to find that thing that defines us. We need to do that, which the regional juggernauts cannot do, and do it well. If a “dead-end valley” can do it, so can we.

Fun Beyond the Boerewors Curtain

Revelry and great wine on DuToitskloof Wines’ front lawns.

Residents of Cape Town’s northern suburbs have had to contend with the moniker of living beyond the Boerewors Curtain for years. For a length of time, I’ve wondered exactly where this curtain is drawn spatially. I’ve hypothetically placed this metaphorical curtain at the N7, but geographic debates aside. Those who live beyond this curtain have one glaring positive; they’re so much closer to the bulk of the Cape Winelands.

If Durbanville residents are beyond the Boerewors Curtain, then surely when one goes through the tunnel near Paarl, you’re in the Offal Section? If the Cape is a giant butchery, are we the liver and kidneys and the Cape Town CBD the fillet mignon? If this is so, offal has never been this good…

Rawsonville and its associated Breedekloof Wine Route are about to pull out all the stops. The second weekend of October is time for any Cape resident or visitor to get out of their comfort zones and explore this ‘exotic side of the butchery.’ If there is any weekend when this lesser-known region shines and dons a cloak of excitement, entertainment and excellence, it is now. The Breedekloof Outdoor and Wine Festival is not to be missed, if finding quality and hidden-gems is your thing.

You may think venturing beyond the tunnel leaves you starved for amenities and options. This simply is not true, especially on this weekend. Many a visitor has commented on how this region’s scenery is awe-inspiring, out-competing most wine regions in shear mountainous beauty. Many also remark how wine quality and price-point leaves them dumbfounded. The genuineness of the valley’s residents, quaint eateries and personable accommodation and wineries leave our guests with lingering memories.

If you haven’t experienced the fun to be had, sipping some of the country’s best Sauvignon Blanc under towering mountains, embarking on outdoor activities next to crystal clear streams, rocking to live music amongst the vines or just traversing an excellent wine route with close friends, this is your weekend. Only R60 opens up the entire region’s wines to you, with festival passes valid from Friday to Sunday; however, if you want to experience the real fun, Saturday’s your day!

Wake up at a respectable hour this Saturday, put on your comfortable shoes, get your car keys and have your R60 at the ready. It’s only an hour’s drive from Cape Town CBD, or a quick-and-easy 45 minutes for those lucky enough to live beyond the Boerewors Curtain and come visit our section. I promise you, the wines, entertainment and hospitality will not disappoint. You’ll wonder why you never chose to day-trip to Rawsonville before!

What Makes a Wine Region Successful?

The lesser known wine regions often desperately ponder what makes a wine region successful. It often erupts into a highly emotional, raucous debate where conflicting views pit conservatives against liberals and protectionists against the globally-minded.

Visitors enjoying some wine at a seemingly more successful Soetes&Soup Festival

What is very concerning about insular and lesser known wine regions, is often the fact they are lesser known, makes them even more adverse to letting go of their protectionist, almost survivalist mentality; the whole psychology of, the worse off you are, the harder you try to hoard what you have left. However, this is often a counterintuitive measure that results in more hardship.

Albeit, the worse your financial position is, the more difficult it becomes to invest in the very things that will improve your financial position. This goes for wine regions in general and some forgotten rural towns of the Western Cape. Such wasted glory is a sad sight; beautiful towns with surroundings that take your breath away, towns that Europeans, Americans and Canadians would die to see. However, these towns are locked in a poverty cycle, locked in protectionist mentalities and economic stagnation; few amenities exist and poor tourism and economic vision creates a toxic mix perpetuating the hardship.

Most wine regions also understand that any large body requires a heart, a core; a tourism and services hub that ties all the far-flung estates, cellars and other attractions together. Stellenbosch uses this very effectively and although Pniel, Kylemore and Klapmuts fall within this wine-of-origin area, they realise their core is the town of Stellenbosch. Even the new kid on the block, Robertson, grasps this. Bonnievale, McGregor and Ashton playing the role of the smaller cousins, but the natural and logical nucleus is Robertson and this name is what draws the tourists to the region as a whole.

Robertson is often used as a paragon of how an obscure region can quickly and effectively propel itself into the national and even international wine region limelight. Their festival, the Wacky Wine drink-fest that it is, is either loved or loathed. However no matter which way you slice it, it is deeply ingrained in the wine-drinking psyche and Robertson has created a model of marketing success. This success spills into their town’s main streets; cafés, restaurants, boutiques and new retail outlets are opening on a regular basis. Their main thoroughfares are well-maintained, meticulously landscaped and their success and tourism-mindedness almost exudes out of the pavements.

Contrast this with the Breedekloof Wine Route, a wine region with no town’s name, a region created for marketing purposes only. In fact, no Breedekloof exists, except in a brochure and in company name. Breedekloof is geographically, simply the western Breede River Valley. Then there’s the dysfunctional heart, Rawsonville – The town that never was. Here, lack of vision exudes from the cracked pavements, stagnation and rural blight is exposed for all to see. A horrific pity for a wine region that probably boasts the best value-for-money wines, produces the most wine in the country and arguably has some of the most dramatic landscapes of any wine region south of the equator. In fact, it is the region where the most vineyards get planted annually – production is on the up, in stark contrast to many regions in contraction. Where did it all go awry?

Frankly, lack-of-vision, protectionism and absence of partnerships; Breedekloof has been given a double-edged sword: genuine, down to earth people who make you feel you’re the only tourist here. The other unfortunate edge, the one whose roots are so deeply imbedded in the soil of the valley, the branches cannot reach over the mountain, never mind the rest of the globe. Thus, the solution; allowing visionaries to take the reigns in forging partnerships to get the town off its knees, allowing the knowledgeable to drive regional marketing and permitting lateral-thinkers to assume positions where a mandate can be carried out. Conservatism and protectionism is often threatened by these very aforementioned traits, often extricating or dismissing these individuals and ideas, using emotive arguments protecting tradition and patriarchy. However, disallowing this will end up only perpetuating the very hardship these protectionists lament.

Can lesser known wine regions achieve success? Yes, it has already been done, the proof exists. This success comes from letting go of those things the collective within the region know little about. Most are farmers, wine-makers or in associated agricultural services. Do what you do best, stick to your core business and allow people who have vision, to cultivate your success outside the vineyard. However, a word of warning; other regions are moving apace. To build a strong collective Cape Winelands brand, it is imperative that all Cape wine regions can hold their own and compete on a similar level, in a healthy manner. Waiting too long to jump aboard the marketing-train makes for an even more difficult game of catch-up. Don’t allow your region to eventually wake up one day and realise:

Our valley has been forgotten!

Petrol vs. Wine: The Real Cost of Staying Close

Aerial of western Breede River Valley (our region), with 1995m high DuToit's Peak looming behind.

With the price of desert-juice from Saudi Arabia rising at alarming rates, the ability to buy that which is illegal there, namely fermented juice of the vine, is becoming more and more difficult. In fact, it’s frightening to note that bulk wine can cost up to five times less that of petrol.  Scary! Perhaps we should start synthesising bio-fuel from grapes?

That aside, the wine connoisseur is left wanting; often having to choose between the flagship red, or having enough money for Caltex. Drive and drink like a pauper or walk and drink like a sommelier.

Keeping a Capetonian from the Winelands is like keeping a penguin from the water. Most need their weekend pilgrimage to the estates to see what’s on offer; to taste something delicious and new. After all, we pay the “lifestyle tax” of earning less in the Cape compared to our Gauteng compatriots, so we need to take advantage of that which we pay this “tax” for.

The logical conclusion for the petrol-wary-wine-seeking Capetonian: stay close, we’ll save. This logic is understandable; Constantia, Durbanville, Stellenbosch, Paarl and Franschhoek all seem too alluring. People seldom blink an eye departing for a daytrip to the gorgeous vineyards of the Huguenots in ourFrench Corner. However, what few fathom is, that when you turn off the N1 onto the R45 (in Paarl) to explore the wineries of Franschhoek, the time taken to reach them is almost identical to pushing on through the tunnel to Rawsonville.

Yes, Breedekloof Wine Route and Rawsonville is not much more effort, yet the psychological barrier of the statuesque mountains keeps people in a mindset of: “It’s too far for a daytrip.” It simply isn’t!

The cost of petrol and toll; this is understandable fuzzy-logic again. However, Breedekloof runs on quality and value, whereas regions on the other side run on acclaim. What little extra is spent at Caltex or Engen is saved on value-for-money. Embarking on a wine tour in the hinterland will leave your wallet a little heavier upon leaving, yet not compromising on quality.

DuToitskloof Wines is a perfect example, once again announced Best Value for Money Cellar. It has been forced to build its name on giving the consumer more than they expect. It cannot run on the fame of Rawsonville; who’s heard of Rawsonville outside the Western Cape? Few, except the most geographically minded. So, local Breedekloof Wine Route producers have to pursue quality over fame to get their share of the competitive wine market.

Nevertheless, the genuine-feel of Rawsonville and the Breedekloof region of being off the beaten track, means visitors feel like guests, not like Disney-ticket holders waiting for the Winery’s-Wild-Ride.

Do yourself a favour and spend a little more at the pump, but get so much more at the cellar. The hinterland has much to see and do and even more to taste. The mountains erupt from the valley floor in a more spectacular fashion, the drive is almost unworldly in its beauty, the people welcoming and the wine, comparable to those from “that side of the berg,” but at half the price.

A little initial investment will yield great returns. Invest in a trip through the Huguenot Tunnel, but don’t tell the Huguenots in our neighbouring valley I told you to.