Skoukos vir Kokkedore

Loop en eet kan net so uitdagend soos loop en wyndrink wees. Maar dis nou waarmee die deelnemers in die tweede episode van Kokkedoor, die KykNet TV-reeks waarvan Du Toitskloof Wines die wynborg is, moes rekening hou. Ja, hulle moes kook vir Prins Albert se plaaslike landbouskou, met die klem op jafels – daardie ronde geroosterde broodjie-smaaklikhede – en die onontbeerlike boereworsrolletjie.

Sjef Nic van Wyk, een van die beoordelaars, het ook gewys hoe ’n volstruiskerrie “bunny-chow” gemaak word. Maar om hierdie homp kerrievleis-gevulde brood op ’n drafstap te eet is vir mors-soek. Om van die snaakse kyke nie te praat nie.

O ja, die pannekoek – ’n landbouskou sonder ’n pannekoek is soos ’n langarm-dans sonder ’n konsertina. Die deelnemers moes ’n soet pannekoek maak, en kykers wat nog in die warm weer van ’n laatsomer vasgevang is sou hoop die winter kom pronto, want ’n pannekoek bly darem ’n smul-heerlike ding.

Hier by Du Toitskloof hou ons van ons pannekoek eenvoudig: kaneelsuiker en ’n knerts suurlemoensap, baie dankie. Dis al. En dan sluk ons hom af met ons Rooi Muskadel, en jy’s soet agter die ore maar lekker bly lekker.

Met ’n boereworsrol kan mens ’n glasie rooiwyn geniet – Cabernet Sauvignon of Shiraz van Du Toitskloof is nommerpas. En as dit by die jafel kom, wat deur die Kokkedore met gekerriede volstruisvleis gevul is, stry ons hier by die kelder: is Chardonnay die regte wyn om hiermee saam te bedien, of hunker ons na die staatmaker Sauvignon Blanc?

Die Du Toitskloof-span het tydens die tweede aflewering van Kokkedoor net weer eens besef hoe geseënd ons in die wynbedryf is. Chris, een van die deelnemers, het laat weet hy eet nie volstruisvleis nie aangesien hy op ’n volstruisplaas grootgeword het en daardie vleis deesdae nie oor sy lippe kan forseer nie. Wel, ons wat op wynplase geskool is sit gelukkig nie met daardie probleem nie.

Toe uitstemtyd tydens gisteraand se episode aanbreek, wou-wou ’n paar van die deelnemers na die wynglas gryp om die senuwees te kalm. Gelukkig vir hulle het die beoordelaars besluit om niemand uit te stem nie.

Noem ons dit die stilte voor die storm?

Wag vir volgende week se Kokkedoor. Donderdagaande om 20:00. Kyk dit net op KykNet.

Building Trust in Critical Thought

Johan de Wet (DuToitskloof Wines chairperson) left with (2013 winner) Tim James right.

Johan de Wet (DuToitskloof Wines chairperson) left with (2013 winner) Tim James right.

On the 22nd of November, Du Toitskloof Wines and Standard Bank awarded the first annual Wine Writer of the Year Award to Tim James. A prize of R30,000 was given for his critical piece on the impacts of climate change on the South African wine industry. The actual article is still under embargo, for the exclusivity of publishing houses.

Wine writers do not have it particularly easy. Their reputation as leaders of critical thought may proceed them, but the payment for the value they add is not always forthcoming. The South African wine industry is notoriously small. This can complicate the environment for those who wish to point out inconsistencies in the industry, who wish to be critical of cellars or appellations, or those who wish to push the envelope of free thought.

When one believes one’s work is not adjudicated without bias, is can be disheartening. There is nothing greater that shackles the creative-mind more, than the notion that independent opinion is stifled and that free thought goes uncelebrated. However, this slight negativity has been turned on its head by the ironclad vetting, strict auditing and administrative integrity of the Du Toitskloof Wines and Standard Bank Wine Writer of the Year Awards.

The awe was palpable at the awards evening, held on the 22nd of November at Terra Mare in Paarl. There was a relieved disbelief that Du Toitskloof Wines and Standard Bank, the convener and headline sponsor, had no knowledge of who the entrants were, until that night; that names were only given by the independent auditors PriceWaterhouseCoopers, to the PR agency, for invitational purposes only. Entrants were astounded by the organiser’s lack of inside information.

This is how it should be done. This allows that free thought and independent opinion to be just that, free and independent. The fervor with which PriceWaterhouseCoopers kept any details under lock-and-key rendered undue influence impossible. 

It is also important to note, that the judging panel was academic-heavy. If the judging is seen as being populated by industry insiders, credibility goes a begging. However, when you have the esteemed Dr. Gawie Botma, chair of the Stellenbosch Department of Journalism, convening a panel of academics and writers, like Erns Grundling, Maureen Joubert and Prof. Ian Glen, the quality of interpretation of opinion is cemented. Despite the reported high-quality of each entrant, the judging panel was unanimous in its decision of the 2013 winner, highlighting the exemplary nature of Tim James’ writing.

It came to light that only five entrants were received; albeit a small step forward, a cursory glance around the venue would have you believe that all the top wine writers were present and this was indeed the case. All the biggest names entered. It is acknowledged however, that new blood is necessary, for new blood is to the body as new thought is to critical opinion.

The value of translating scientific jargon into layman’s terms is unquantifiable. The research, effort and subsequent simplification of Climate Change terminology is invaluable, as it is now within easy reach of the industry and those interested in it. The publication possibilities and knowledge gained, by writing about such a critical issue, cannot be underestimated.

It is also hoped, the competition will gain traction and fame as the years go by, transforming the notion that the-other-side-of-the-mountain is ‘that lesser part of the Winelands,’ to being ‘a region synonymous with excellence, global-reach and innovative ideas.’

One cannot expect the wine writing fraternity to fall in love with another competition overnight. Trust and respect is earned. We hope our respectful actions will embolden that trust. It is clear for us and for Standard Bank that 2013 was just the beginning for Wine Writer of the Year. The affections from those who entered gave us a similar indication of long-term commitment. That 2014 will see a greater influx as credibility of the process is made known.

We raise a glass of Brut to the custodians of free thought. We raise this glass to those who had initial confidence in us. We raise the glass to those who will follow suit in 2014. As long as we are the purveyors of value-for-money wines, we will be the purveyors of progress and excellence in a notoriously difficult industry, for without critical self-reflection, we cannot hope to grow and improve. 

By Andres de Wet

Master-Coup For Winelands

Arnold Tanzer (MasterChef: Food on the Move), Samantha Linsell (MasterChef Food Stylist: Drizzle&Dip), Benny Masekwameng (MasterChef Judge)

Arnold Tanzer (MasterChef: Food on the Move), Samantha Linsell (MasterChef Food Stylist: Drizzle&Dip), Benny Masekwameng (MasterChef Judge)

MasterChef season two began airing on M-NET with great fanfare, being heavily punted by the South African pay-TV broadcaster and well-received by the South African viewing public. What can be said with the greatest conviction is that the production quality of this hit reality TV-series is beyond compare. The food styling, wine presentation, culinary complexity, camera work and post-production mastery have not been seen on this level in local South African productions, until now.

How lucky are we that this reality TV masterpiece takes place at Nederburg in Paarl, a huge coup for the Cape Winelands. We can only hope that international TV-stations will snap up this series from M-NET, to give our region some exposure outside of Africa and DStv’s footprint. The show puts the Cape on show, both scenically and culinarily. Seafood on the West Coast, to traditional Cape-cuisine in the Winelands, Cape Malay in the city’s Bo-Kaap to food on the open fire at Mzoli’s in Gugulethu – it is proudly South African and boastful of the diversity in a mere 150km radius of Cape Town in every possible way.

MasterChef has popularised food and wine. It has turned its creative masters into overnight sensations. We have been fortunate enough to host the friendly, knowledgeable and talented Benny Masekwameng (MasterChef SA judge) at DuToitskloof Cellar, at a culinary competition in August 2012. It has made food and wine “hip and happening” again, taking the passion out of 5-star restaurants and classy wine estates and right into people’s hearts and homes.

I had reservations about the show, prior to season one’s launch in March of 2012. The Australian version of the show is stellar, albeit extremely lengthy, and tops their national viewership rankings. The American version, although boasting Gordon Ramsay, was an epic fail. The U.S. need for speed trumped the format, with the series feeling rushed, one was unable to emotionally attach to the contestants and the challenges and culinary complexity was lackluster to say the least. Not with MasterChef SA however. They opted for a hybrid between the Australian and American versions and their season two, seems to be following the successful former’s format more closely than season one.

The largest reservation was about South African broadcasters’ Johannesburg-centricity. As much as the economic juggernaut has the bulk of local television infrastructure; a culinary, viticulture and fresh-produce capital it is not. Any thought of a culinary contest being held on the Highveld was as absurd as having a mining-entrepreneurship ‘Apprentice’ series set in Cape Town. To my delight, Paarl emerged bright, mountainous and carpeted in vines, on screen; a mere twenty minutes drive from our cellar’s front door.

We hope the start of season two will bolster interest in the Cape Winelands even more, as a scenic culinary and viticulture destination beyond compare. It is hoped it will broaden the scope of people’s perceptions of the region, of being more than just Stellenbosch. When you’re struck by the helicopter-shot panorama of the approach to the MasterChef kitchen, notice the mountains beyond. There lies the gateway to our region, just a few kilometers over the peaks.

Hopefully, our region too, can learn lessons from this show. Popularisation can be positive if it’s done sensitively, fusing the genuineness of what you have to offer with intense public interest. Given that MasterChef is only a mountain range away, here’s to foisting our region into the popular spotlight.

By: Andres de Wet

Whine For the End Of the World

On a day like today, a scorching 38°C in December, one wonders how people can still think climate change is some psychotic-lobby-group myth. After a solid week-and-a-half of unseasonably hot weather, with humidity that is unheard of in our summers, you get plain peeved at those people’s opinions that deny the existence of scientific fact. They are basically saying, “Stuff you farmers, we don’t care if you need to make a living and the climate change you feel is real; we don’t live off the climate like you do, but our belief system knows better than your daily physical observations.”

Then I get to thinking: This could be the end! The summer solstice could precipitate Armageddon anyway, why moan? The Mayan long-count calendar ends the current 13th b’ak’tun on the 21st of December; for those in the northern hemisphere, the winter solstice, I might add. So, is this the end of the world, or the end of a particular epoch? Or, as Y2K did, shall it pass with nothing more than another sunrise and sunset?

You may be forgiven for thinking it’s the end of the world in Kiribati, Maldives, Marshall Islands or Tuvalu. Many of these atoll island nations are already planning their mass evacuations due to rising sea-levels. That stupid climate change again…

Or perhaps you’re in London and it’s once again, dreary and bloody cold, with those ‘lovely’ sunsets before four in the freekin’ afternoon! Does the world end in fire or ice? Well, to us in the Southern Hemisphere it must be fire, we’re burning up! To those in the United Kingdom, it must be a winter tempest of epic proportions. To the islanders, we’re all going to drown in water of biblical proportions.

For some, the apocalypse is delayed; it arrives in January with that long list of Christmas gifts gleefully charged with reckless abandon in December. Only, to later bite one’s bank account in the ‘other word for a donkey.’

So as 2012 comes to a close and we all reflect on the year and what may, or may not come, raise your glasses! Forget about all these troubles for a couple sacred days of vacation during the festive season. Forget if 2012 was great or not, forget if the apocalypse looms or not, forget if you’re a climate change skeptic or pundit. Just think: Is it hot or is it cold? Is it time for a red or a white? How many family and friends do I have? How much wine must I get?

For to whine at this time of year is futile, we shall thus wine. Wine and dine and worry about worldly troubles in 2013, for ‘tis the season to be mildly intoxicated with loved ones; as long as one takes public transit or stays put. Whatever the Mayans may have you believe; be certain: If no asteroid hits us, we’ll be looking after the grapes for you, despite our climate being a royal pain in the rear end. Rest assured we’ll be making you the best the vine has to offer for New Years 2013 and beyond.

Du Toitskloof wishes you and yours a trouble-free end to the 13th b’ak’tun, a blessed Christmas and a prosperous New Year.

Christmas card-2